Dear Brothers and Sisters,
The Holy Year of Mercy invites all of us to reflect on the relationship between communication and mercy.  The Church, in union with Christ, the living incarnation of the Father of Mercies, is called to practice mercy as the distinctive trait of all that she is and does.  What we say and how we say it, our every word and gesture, ought to express God’s compassion, tenderness and forgiveness for all.  Love, by its nature, is communication; it leads to openness and sharing.  If our hearts and actions are inspired by charity, by divine love, then our communication will be touched by God’s own power
As sons and daughters of God, we are called to communicate with everyone, without exception.  In a particular way, the Church’s words and actions are all meant to convey mercy, to touch people’s hearts and to sustain them on their journey to that fullness of life which Jesus Christ was sent by the Father to bring to all.  This means that we ourselves must be willing to accept the warmth of Mother Church and to share that warmth with others, so that Jesus may be known and loved.  That warmth is what gives substance to the word of faith; by our preaching and witness, it ignites the “spark” which gives them life.
Communication has the power to build bridges, to enable encounter and inclusion, and thus to enrich society.  How beautiful it is when people select their words and actions with care, in the effort to avoid misunderstandings, to heal wounded memories and to build peace and harmony.  Words can build bridges between individuals and within families, social groups and peoples. This is possible both in the material world and the digital world.  Our words and actions should be such as to help us all escape the vicious circles of condemnation and vengeance which continue to ensnare individuals and nations, encouraging expressions of hatred.  The words of Christians ought to be a constant encouragement to communion and, even in those cases where they must firmly condemn evil, they should never try to rupture relationships and communication.
For this reason, I would like to invite all people of good will to rediscover the power of mercy to heal wounded relationships and to restore peace and harmony to families and communities. 

All of us know how many ways ancient wounds and lingering resentments can entrap individuals and stand in the way of communication and reconciliation.  The same holds true for relationships between peoples.  In every case, mercy is able to create a new kind of speech and dialogue.  Shakespeare put it eloquently when he said: “The quality of mercy is not strained.  It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven upon the place beneath.  It is twice blessed: it blesseth him that gives and him that takes” (The Merchant of Venice, Act IV, Scene I).

Pope Francis